Featured Commercial Kitchen for Rent in Cranford, NJ

We would like to introduce you to CEC Research’s state-of-the-art kitchen facility located in Cranford, New Jersey at 16 Commerce Drive. This brand-new commercial kitchen is available to rent for daily use.

Commercial Kitchen for Rent Cranford NJ

Kitchen features include:

2 commercial refrigerators – 2 commercial freezers – 12 ft. hood – Quick disconnects for gas equipment – 50 outlets on their own circuit for microwaves, blenders, etc. – Commercial water purification system – Commercial ice maker – 3 compartment sink – Hand sink – 8 1200 watt microwaves – 2 Vulcan ovens with 6 burners each – Heavy duty deep fat fryer – Salandar broiler – Char broil grill – Commercial dishwasher

Kitchen for Rent CEC Research Cranford NJ

Want to Cook It Here?

Click here to visit CEC Research’s kitchen listing on the Cook It Here website. There, you will find additional information about the kitchen as well as contact information

You can also visit their website at http://cecresearch.com/our-facilities/

Choose the Right Commercial Kitchen Ventilation System For You

Disclosure: This is a sponsored post from Extraction Canopy.

A quality ventilation system is undoubtedly one of the most important things to have in any commercial kitchen. A commercial kitchen without a ventilation system in place is not only unsafe, but illegal – and if you choose a ventilation system ill-suited to your commercial kitchen, you may as well have not invested in one at all. If unsure, seek professional guidance from commercial kitchen ventilation experts like Extraction Canopy. Their professional guidance will help you determine which of their many ventilation and extraction systems is right for your kitchen.

Standard Extraction Canopy

A standard commercial kitchen extraction canopy completes the simple task of extracting impure air and returning clean air to a commercial kitchen environment. The greater the depth of a commercial canopy, the more unclean air it can filter – so a commercial kitchen using only electrical equipment would only need a canopy around 1000mm, whilst kitchens using a range of gas, electrical and steaming equipment would need something closer to 1500mm in depth.

Island Canopy

Island canopies tend to be mounted on the ceiling, covering a number of cookers, fryers, ovens and other pieces of kitchen equipment standing in the middle of a room – hence the term ‘island’ canopy. They are usually very large but can be made to measure.

Condense Canopy Hood

These canopies are mainly installed over equipment which produces steam in, such as dishwashers, boilers or sinks. The large stainless steel surface area of box-style canopies allows them to collect steam, which turns back into liquid when coming into contact with the metal and is then emptied through a drainage tap attached to the canopy.

Ductless Kitchen Canopy

Where it is impossible to vent air outdoors, a ductless hood is a worthy substitute for commercial kitchens using light to medium duty electric catering equipment. This commercial ventilation system filters air through four different stages before returning it back into the kitchen environment.

Extraction Canopy with Fan

Extraction systems can be supplied with internal or external fans, the speed of which can be modified to regulate heat levels and save energy.

The many different types of commercial kitchen ventilation systems, coupled with the fact that Extraction Canopy allow customers to customize and design their own canopy systems ensures you’ll find the correct ventilation system for your business.

Disclosure: This is a sponsored post from Extraction Canopy. Cook It Here received compensation from Extraction Canopy in exchange for writing this blog post.

At Your Service: Becoming a Personal Chef

Once considered an exclusive luxury for only the very wealthy, personal chefs are becoming more commonplace. Whether it’s the increasing demands on the average American schedule, our growing awareness of nutritional issues, higher standards for food preparation or some combination of those factors, more people are using personal chefs than ever before. According to the American Personal and Private Chef Association (APPCA), “the current number of personal chefs is estimated at 9,000, serving 72,000 customers. Industry observers predict the number will double in the next 5 years.”

What exactly is a personal chef? A personal chef prepares meals for clients according to the clients’ needs and preferences. Unlike a caterer, who delivers prepared foods to clients, a personal chef prepares food in the client’s home or in a rented commercial kitchen. A personal chef should not be confused with a private chef, which is a chef that cooks exclusively for only one client, family or organization.

Some personal chefs will plan and prepare meals that can be quickly heated and served by the client, stocking the client’s freezer on a weekly basis so the client has heat-and-serve-meals on busy weeknights. Others will completely handle the process from planning to shopping to serving.

The path to becoming a personal chef is varied. Some go to culinary school with the intention of beginning a personal chef business, while others find themselves leaving the stressful world of restaurant kitchens for the independence and slower pace of personal chefdom.

If you’re interested in becoming a personal chef, many training programs are available. APPCA is one of several organizations that offer training programs and business support for those pursuing careers as personal or private chefs. Another well-known organization is the United States Personal Chef Association (USPCA). On their websites, these organizations offer everything from advice on pricing meals to online stores where you can purchase cooking tools. There are also community forums where you can gather information and opinions from other personal chefs.

As with any startup business, there’s groundwork to be done. You’ll need to comply with federal, state and local regulations regarding the licensing of your business. Depending on how much money you earn, you will most likely need a business license for any city you do business in. If you’ll be doing business under a company name (i.e. Meals By Meg, or Kitchen Concierge) then you’ll need to file a fictitious business name statement with the county in which you live. You’ll also need a current food handler’s certificate which can be obtained through your local health agency.

Most importantly, you’ll need clients. You can register with online agencies that match clients with personal chefs . APPCA and USPCA both offer such registries. Also, use our tips to build your network and get referrals.

And if you need a commercial kitchen, visit CookItHere.com to locate an available kitchen in your area.

Renting a Kitchen: A First-Timer’s Guide

If you’re a food entrepreneur, and you’ve never rented a kitchen before, the process can seem daunting. First, there’s the matter of finding a commercial kitchen to rent, and then hoping it’s available when you need it. We’ve observed the difficulty in that process first-hand; that’s why CookItHere.com was born. Hopefully, you’ve found this blog in conjunction with the main site, where you can search for a kitchen to rent. CookItHere.com lists commercial kitchens for rent by location, and we’re working to add photos, reviews and availability to each profile to make finding a kitchen near you even easier.

When selecting a kitchen, do some research to be sure that you’ll have everything you need. You’ll want to tour the kitchen before you decide; nothing beats a visit to assess cleanliness, quality and space efficiency. Here are a few basic questions to consider before you make your choice:

  • Is it certified by the local health department? Is the certification current?
  • What are the rates? Some facilities rent hourly; others have longer minimums.
  • What equipment is available?
  • What storage options—refrigerator, freezers, pantries—are available, and what are the rules and rates pertaining specifically to storage?
  • How much security deposit is required, and what is the process for getting it returned to you?
  • What unique features does it have? If you’re doing classes, you’ll need viewing space, or tasting/ dining space. Some kitchens even have larders you can access (for a fee) for on-hand ingredients.
  • General amenities: if you’re planning to spend any significant time at the kitchen, check out parking and restroom facilities in advance.

Before you can use a commercial kitchen, you’ll have to fill out an application and submit certain documents to the proprietor. Here is a list of commonly required documents:

  • Proof of liability insurance. There’s no getting around it; any commercial kitchen worth its salt will require that you have liability insurance. Amounts vary, but most we’ve seen require coverage of at least $1,000,000  with the kitchen named as additional insured.
  • Food handler’s certificate. This varies by location and by your business, but most local governments will require some kind of certification for any commercial food operation.
  • Business license. It is possible to rent a commercial kitchen for non-commercial use—ask the kitchen operator about individual policies—but many require that you have a business license.
  • Classes and/or orientations. Again, depending on the location, you may be required to attend a health department class or pass an inspection or test before you can use a commercial kitchen. Other kitchens have their own orientation programs that you must complete before you can get cooking.

Once you’re up and running, let us know how you like the kitchen you selected. Cookithere.com allows you to post reviews. And if you find a kitchen that’s not on our site, be sure to let us know—we’ll add it.